At the Housewares Show: Cooks, Colors in the Kitchen

CHICAGO--Celebrity chefs, eye-popping colors and licensing agreements are making news at the International Home & Housewares Show, now in its third day.

 

Marking his second Housewares Show with Dansk, Mario Batali added a larger cast iron pan to his line to make it easier for cooking meals for families. "I love the way that [cast iron] cooks," Batali told HFN. And it's more forgiving than other cookware, he added, giving cooks a larger margin of error.

 

New cast iron lines from Tramontina include its Enameled Cast Iron, a limited edition series--its highest quality assortment--that is available in four colors and is induction friendly. Meyer also released its lightweight cast iron line with KitchenAid, as well as new shapes and stainless steel knobs in its Rachael Ray cast iron offering.

The Cookware Company launched its colorful Fiesta licensed line, which also

includes enameled cast iron, and with the Fiesta logo. Initially in four colors--scarlet, ivory, colbalt and turquoise--the new line also includes aluminum and stainless steel cookware lines.

Products that create sweet treats proliferate, such as Kuhn Rikon's Ultimate Cupcake Set, Meyer's fondue pot in the Rachael Ray line and Zoku's single pop maker.

 

Helen of Troy debuted a new personal-care brand, Beauty Chic, at the International Home + Housewares Show.

The new brand encompasses spa products for skin, hand and foot care.

 

Cake pop makers are also a trending treat. The Entemann's brand from Durakleen has a new cake pop set, as well as a mini set for kids.

 

Items that fold up, nest within or otherwise take up less space are huge at the show.

 

Robinson Home showed its Squish line of collapsible colanders and other kitchenware. DKB's Zyliss 3-in-1 folding grater with acid-etched blades folds into itself and safely stores away. And cookware with melamine bowls nest into each other at Twiztt, the Cookware Company's new brand with Joan Lunden.

 

In tabletop, designs are transitional, offering modern takes on traditional shapes or themes. Texture is important in all categories, particularly in flatware. In dinnerware, texture is being conveyed through a host of new patterns.

Cambridge Silversmiths enters the dinnerware category with a new slate of patterns in partnership with design group Wild Olive. The collection includes stoneware with wax-resist designs, among others, with a mid-century modern flair.

Gibson unveiled its Isaac Mizrahi lifestyle collection including tabletop and cookware. The line comes with eye-catching, pink-accented packaging.

Ten Strawberry Street has a robust new boxed set program that includes 14 new patterns, all geared to the younger market (think college age) and priced in the $29.99 to $39.99 range.

Prima Designs has signed a license agreement with chef Marcela Valladolid, known for her Mexican cooking show on Food Network.

HFN Staff | News & Commentary

HFN provides detailed information on the key home classifications: Housewares, Tabletop, Floor Covering & Rugs, Furniture, Home Textiles, Lighting, Home Decor, Mattresses & Bedding, Gifts, Major Appliances and Consumer Electronics as well as Business, Finance and Retail.

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